Perhaps the most common trait that small and large companies attempt to instill into their employees is leadership. They mostly do this through leadership programs. These leadership programs often come with myths—misconceptions about those who tried to be leaders and those who have failed. Fortunately, you can grow as a leader with true leadership qualities once you know these myths. Therefore, the following list includes three common myths about leadership.

 

Leaders are Only the Boss

The myth that leaders and leadership, in general, can only be found at the top has stifled many potential talents. When you are told that you have no power or say in business matters, it can be rather challenging to feel a part of the company. The reality is that leadership comes in many forms and within many levels of the company. The person who is always making sure that communication is being created, even if it’s not their job, is a leader. The project manager, a leader, and those the project manager appoints to do certain tasks.

 

True Leaders Can Do It All

Perhaps the most destructive of myths include the lone wolf leadership mentality. It is often portrayed on television and in movies and therefore absorbed by many at a young age. The reality is that a true leader always seeks help whether they need it or don’t. A perfect example of this is Apple founder Steve Jobs. Understanding that he couldn’t do it all, he often sought out experts in particular fields, which then allowed him to concentrate on the company’s marketing aspect. As you may know by now, Apple went on to become a giant in the telephone & computer industry.

 

Leaders Must Focus on Results Rather than People

Sure, every leader wants to make sure that they have concrete proof of positive results. However, you cannot obtain those results unless you focus on the people helping you get those results in the first place. When a leader chooses to disconnect from clients and staff, they are disconnecting their ear to the ground. This means they will often be the last to know about serious issues or rising trends that could have potentially made them a more significant profit.